Ex Libris

The weather in London is just glorious at the moment. Apparently it’s hotter here than much of the Mediterranean (I love how we manage to make the meteorology a competition) though we all know it will be short lived. Back to normal temperatures and light rain by Friday. I’m afraid  couldn’t bear staying indoors and doing the podcast  so I have spent most of the weekend doing the only sensible thing; namely lying in a park with a good book.

I’m devouring the complexities of the Tudor court in Hilary Mantel’s Wolf Hall at present. Excellent stuff, although quite densely written. It’s beautiful though and well worth the concentration.

But I’m already looking around for the next book. (That’s a lie actually, I’m always looking for the next book) and a quick glance in Waterstones today made me almost yelp with excitement when I saw that the new David Mitchell book is out. Cloud Atlas is one of the most original and brilliant things I’ve ever read, so I can’t wait to try The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet. It’s set in eighteenth century Japan and it has the most beautiful cover. (I don’t care what the proverbs say, I always judge a book by its cover. Amazon doesn’t really do this one justice, it’s the kind where they’ve printed on the board of the hardback and it has touches of gold and it’s really very pretty).

I also spotted Scarlett Thomas’s new book. I’ve enjoyed her previous titles, Pop Co and The End of Mr Y, even though they occasionally made my brain ache with their clever use of maths, codes, and alternate realities, and this time round she appears to be encompassing time travel, so I was looking forward to Our Tragic Universe anyway. But a read of the back cover made me realise I was going to have to read it, since the blurb mentions ‘a knitting pattern for the shape of the universe’. I mean, that must require one hell of a chart. And possibly some four-dimensional knitwear.  My mind is boggling already….

Do you know any other books that have managed to sneak some knitting in there?

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9 Responses to Ex Libris

  1. mooncalf says:

    Oh I had tickets to go and see David Mitchell talk about his new novel last week and the damn volcano piped up and he got stuck in Ireland. Gutted!

  2. KnittyLynn says:

    I’m listening to Wolf Hall right now and enjoying it. It is dense, but very interesting to see that time period from a different point of view. Next up for me is The Lace Reader by Brunonia Barry, then The Twentieth Wife By Indu Sundaresan and soooon the Girl Who Kicked a Hornet’s Nest. Can’t wait to listen to that one. I’m a die hard audible.com girl. :)

  3. Camille says:

    Cloud Atlas is one of my favorites too.

    I put lots of knitting in my new novel. BWAHAHAHA! I’m obsessed.

  4. Kate in Somerset says:

    This list was compiled some time ago and I don’t know if it’s been updated:
    http://www.woolworks.org/bookref.html

  5. brenda says:

    I’m currently reading “How to Knit a Love Story” – a well written romance novel (don’t sneer – it’s good!) by Rachel Herron. It has a knitter at the centre of it. And a knitting pattern at the end…

    • katie says:

      Hi Brenda – no sneering here! Jane Austen is a well-written romance! But you know what Austen doesn’t have? Knitting. And a knitter heroine. So Herron is clearly onto something, I’ll have to check it out!

  6. Elena. says:

    After reading about Scarlett Thomas in this post a few weeks ago I was very interested in her and checked out her website. I decided to order “The End of Mr. Y” a few days later. During the second half I used every spare minute reading it and finished yesterday. I loved it, but I’m not yet sure what to think about the ending. LOL Today I ordered “PopCo” and will pick it up at the book shop tomorrow. Can’t wait. So, thank for the tip!

    • katie says:

      Hi Elena, Oh fab, I’m so glad you enjoyed the book. I agree, I couldn’t decide about the ending either. Though I like that it leaves room for different reactions and interpretations. PopCo is great fun – lots of snarky digs at marketing and branding that made me laugh. Mixed with a whole load of maths! Hope you enjoy!

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